And You Thought It Was Safe(?)


The Mysterians (1957)
"Last one to Tokyo's a robot chicken!"

“Last one to Tokyo’s a robot chicken!”

Alien invasions are as old as literature. I’ve read versions of the Biblical flood myth that sound more like the plot of tonight’s film than any other part of the Old or New Testaments. Yet ever since the success of George Pal and Byron Haskin’s War of the Worlds (released four years prior to our subject), vicious extraterrestrials have tried to conquer Earth at least once a year, despite repeated, and often embarrassing, setbacks.

Case in point: The Mysterians, first of the many, many, many alien races who threatened Toho Co.’s Japan (and, by extension, The World) with enslavement and annihilation throughout the 1950s, 60s and 70s. And while superhero and space opera films on all sides of the Pacific had long ago burned over this particular district of science fiction, The Mysterians marks the first successful fusion of the alien invasion motif with Ishiro Honda’s daikaiju formula. The result is, to say the least, mixed. But it’s still head and shoulders over what would come after Continue reading

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Godzilla (1954)

He's his own reading light.On March 1, 1954, fallout from the United States’ Castle Bravo nuclear test on Bikini Attol rained down on the  140-ton tuna boat  Daigo Fukury Maru contaminating its twenty-three man crew. All suffered from acute  radiation sickness and one eventually succumbed. According to the Japan Times, his last words were, “I pray that I am the last victim of an atomic or hydrogen bomb.”

Movie producer Tomoyuki Tanaka considered all this on a plane ride home from Indonesia. His latest picture having fallen through, he flew home facing a hole in Toho Studio’s winter release schedule (which used to be what the summer schedule is today) and, in all likelihood, a clutch of manic bosses looking for a hit, fast. The American monster picture King Kong enjoyed a international re-release the previous year, mulching a bumper crop of American giant monster films with all that lovely money it brought in, including The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. In that film a giant dinosaur, awakened by fictional nuclear testing in the Arctic Circle, attacks New York City. What if, Tanaka wondered, a giant monster, awakened by the actual American nuclear tests going on in the Pacific Rim, awoke from its prehistoric slumber and attacked Japan? {More}